Tag Archives: historical fiction

Solve Your Family Mystery

What’s in your family’s past that you have never been able to explain? I would be willing to bet that there is, at least, one mystery that you would like to solve. So, hop in your Marty McFly (Back to the Future) DeLorean Time Machine, albeit an easy chair and laptop, and get to work. Why you may become so excited about your revelations that you’ll be motivated to write a book. Worked for me. In fact, my detective work led to two novels. Discovery is so cool, especially when you have a vested interest. One seemingly meaningless document took […]

PFC Polk was that Good

Characters in stories must be believable. Even amazing superheroes have flaws and weaknesses. Case in point…Kryptonite and Lois Lane make Superman weak and stupid. So, when I decided to write a book about my childhood hero, I was determined to find the holes in his perfection. The star of Farewell PFC POLK is Charles F. Polk, Jr., my Uncle Buddy. He died when I was 7-years-old, which means that I have little recall of the actual man. Most of what I know about him was advanced by my family, the best PR firm ever. Did I want to risk knocking […]

10 Reasons You Should Read Farewell PFC POLK

Ten reasons to read my book. Now there’s a challenge. For me. Not you. Every author struggles with the question, “Who would want to read my book?” Then there’s that annoying inner voice that yells, “Nobody!” Ouch. My best friend recently declared my reader worthiness on Facebook. “He is one of the most Prolific Writers of the 21st Century. If you want a Great Read… Order all his Books.” Thanks, Kurt. Wish everybody felt that way. Most people have no interest in a book about the death of a loved one. Morbid. Sad. Depressing. I get it. “The hero of the […]

An Inside Look at Farewell PFC POLK

Book II from IN THE VALLEY OF HOPE is here! Farewell PFC POLK: The End of a Nightmare opens in 1945 with a troubling nightmare on Charles Polk, Jr.’s 9th birthday. There was that dream again. Buddy sat up in his bed and looked around the room for more pictures like those still fresh on his mind. Black and gray images depicting deep emotions of sorrow, pain, shock and desperation. People he knew: crying, moaning, screaming. There were strangers among them: motionless, speechless, sad. And the hundreds of black flowers on a bed of stars, stripes, and brass buttons made […]

%d bloggers like this: